12 Jeet Kune Do Principles: Angling Part 4

12 Jeet Kune Do Principles: Angling Part 4

How to do it
I leave it up to you whether or not you bring your front foot back in order to get a little more “push” on your side step.

I use it so I can cover a bit more distance, but obviously it has to be done quickly.

The main difference between doing this Angling Step against a kick versus a punch is that, with the punch, you want to step more forward with your back foot so that you’re closer to your opponent.

Other than that, it’s the same movement.

From there you can throw a Hook punch.

Or, what I like to do is to use the momentum to swing my hips all the way back, so I’m loaded up for a Cross as my opponent tries to turn to face me again.

One beautiful thing about throwing the Cross from this position, by the way, is that if you land it while your opponent is still sideways to you, you get the benefit of using a punch that has your entire weight behind it.

And you can land your punch on the side of the opponent’s jaw, twisting his head–which is what a Hook punch does, causing a knockout.

Swinging your hips back, though, to set up for the Cross takes a bit of practice to coordinate, so you’ll have to practice it before it feels natural.

Why not switch leads?
In the video I mention not switching leads, but I didn’t offer an explanation as to why not.

Switching leads is fine, but the reason why I don’t want you to start off that way is because it takes a bit more time, it puts you in a lead that you may not be as comfortable with, and it moves you further away from your opponent.

It’s also easier to switch leads at first–most people do it that way when they’re first starting out.

So I want you to first develop the ability to do it without switching leads.

Once you have the movement down without switching leads, if you prefer switching leads to counter, feel free.

Sifu Forrest



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